Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Community Resources

FUNDING

1.      Strategic Economic and Community Development

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is excited to share a new Rural Development funding opportunity authorized by Section 6025 of the 2014 Farm Bill. This new authority entitled Strategic Economic and Community Development (SECD) prioritizes projects that support the implementation of multi-jurisdictional plans under the Community Facilities Program, Water and Waste Disposal Program, Business and Industry Loan Guarantee Program, and Rural Business Development Grant Program. Under this provision, up to 10 percent of each programs annual appropriations can be set aside and made available to eligible SECD applicants. Many communities already working together to develop multi-jurisdictional plans with the help of strategic partners including non-profit organizations, institutions of higher education, university extensions, regional authorities, coalitions of counties/towns and federal agencies. The goal of SECD is to promote collaboration in rural communities and across Rural Development agencies and programs. Communities are incentivized to align resources, develop long-term community and economic growth strategies and engage federal, state and local partners. By promoting this regional focus USDA resources can be more effectively utilized and have a larger impact on rural capacity building and wealth creation.

 

2.      Colocation America Invites Applications for STEM Innovation Grant

Grants of up to $7,500 will be awarded in support of programs that increase student interest and encourage more students to pursue a career in STEM-related fields....

POSTED: April 19, 2017
DEADLINE: May 26, 2017

 

3.      Assistance for Arts Education Programs-Professional Development for Arts Educators Grants

$7.1 million to support the implementation of high-quality professional development programs for arts educators and other instructional staff of schools in which 50% or more of students are from low-income families.  Eligible: districts, in partnership with public and private entities.  Deadline: May 30.

 

4.      The Brookdale Foundation Group

The Brookdale Foundation Group has issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) for the creation or expansion of supportive services to grandparents and other relatives raising children. Up to 15 programs will be selected to receive a seed grant of $15,000 ($10,000 and $5,000 respectively), contingent upon progress made during year one and potential for continuity in the future. Deadline: 6/5/2017.

 

5.      Turnaround Management Association Invites Nominations for 2017 Excellence in Teaching Awards

The annual $5,000 prize honors teachers who have demonstrated an ability to change students' lives and the communities where they teach....

POSTED: April 21, 2017
DEADLINE: June 12, 2017

 

6.      Fuel Up to Play 60 Invites Applications for K-12 Healthy Food Programs

Grants of up to $4,000 per year will be awarded to qualified K-12 schools to jumpstart healthy changes....

POSTED: April 15, 2017
DEADLINE: June 14, 2017

 

7.      SBA – Program for Investment in Microentrepreneurs Act (PRIME)

PRIME provides grant funding to nonprofit, microenterprise development organizations for the purpose of (i) providing training and technical assistance to disadvantaged entrepreneurs; (ii) providing training and capacity building assistance to microenterprise development organizations (MDOs) and programs; and (iii) aiding in Research and development of best practices for microenterprise and technical assistance programs for disadvantaged entrepreneurs.  Bonus points are awarded to organizations proposing to strengthen the capacity of cooperatives serving economically disadvantaged entrepreneurs and areas; and/or to support entrepreneurship among ex-offenders in the criminal justice system. Applications close on June 16, 2017. 

 

8.      Regional Innovation Strategies 2017 funding available

The Economic Development Administration is seeking applications through June 23 for the 2017 Regional Innovation Strategies program. Through SSTI’s work with Congress, a record $17 million is available this year. Along with increased funding, the notice of funding availability includes a few changes from previous years. More information will also be available in a webinar SSTI is hosting with EDA on May 22 at 3 p.m. EDT.

 

9.      Rural Health and Safety Education Competitive Grants Program
Provides funding to community-based, outreach education and extension programs at land-grant colleges and universities that provide individuals and families based in rural areas with information on health, wellness, and prevention, including information regarding the issue of substance abuse in rural communities.
Geographic Coverage: Nationwide
Application Deadline: Jun 30, 2017
Sponsors: U.S. Department of Agriculture, USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture

 

10.   Distance Learning and Telemedicine Program Grants
Provides grants to improve telemedicine services and distance learning services in rural areas through the use of telemedicine, computer networks, and related advanced technologies.
Geographic Coverage: Nationwide
Application Deadline: Jul 17, 2017
Sponsors: U.S. Department of Agriculture, USDA Rural Development, USDA Rural Utilities Service

 

11.   Delta Health Care Services Grant Program

The Rural Business-Cooperative Service (Agency) is accepting fiscal year (FY) 2017 applications for the Delta Health Care Services (DHCS) grant program. The purpose of this program is to provide financial assistance to address the continued unmet health needs in the Delta Region through cooperation among health care professionals, institutions of higher education, research institutions, and economic development entities in the Delta Region. You must submit completed applications for grants according to the following deadlines:

Ø  Paper copies must be postmarked and mailed, shipped, or sent overnight no later than Monday, July 24, 2017.

Ø  Electronic copies must be received by Monday, July 17, 2017. Late applications are not eligible for funding under this Notice and will not be evaluated.

12.   Rural Business Development Grants
Supports targeted technical assistance, training, and other activities leading to the development or expansion of small and emerging private businesses in rural areas that have fewer than 50 employees and less than $1 million in gross revenues.
Geographic Coverage: Nationwide
Applications accepted on an ongoing basis
Sponsors: U.S. Department of Agriculture, USDA Rural Development

 

13.   SBA Loans
Provides loans to small businesses (including small healthcare practices) for working capital; equipment purchase; real estate purchase; building construction or renovation; business acquisition; and debt refinancing.
Geographic coverage: Nationwide
Applications accepted on an ongoing basis
Sponsor:
Small Business Administration

 

14.   More Grants & Funding

 

PUBLICATIONS

1.      Rural Prevention and Treatment of Substance Abuse Toolkit
This new toolkit, developed by the NORC Walsh Center for Rural Health Analysis, provides information, strategies, and resources to help rural communities implement substance abuse prevention and treatment programs. Browse program models and examples, and learn how to implement, evaluate, and sustain a program in your community and disseminate program results.

 

2.      Survival rates of manufacturing plants vary by county type and ownership structure

Between the 2001 and 2007-09 recessions, U.S. manufacturing employment fell by close to 30 percent. In many communities, the closing of a manufacturing plant can reduce local employment, earnings, and government tax revenue. To improve understanding of the factors affecting the survival of manufacturing plants, ERS studied plant survival over a 15-year period (1996 to 2011). Over this period, the average survival rate—the share of plants that were still employers—in rural (nonmetro) counties was 57 percent. By comparison, plants in urban (metro) counties had an average survival rate of 53 percent during this period. Survival rates also varied by ownership structure: Overall, independent plants (single-unit plants with only one physical location) had a 59-percent survival rate, while multi-unit plants had a 50-percent survival rate. Independent plants located in rural counties had the highest average survival rate (62 percent). Although States and regions have long tended to put more effort into recruiting and retaining multi-unit plants, the research shows that independent plants are more likely to survive—in both rural and urban counties.

 

3.      Households shopping at supermarkets, supercenters, and warehouse club stores have highest healthy basket scores

Over the past two decades, some store formats—including supercenters, dollar stores, and warehouse club stores—have increased their share of Americans’ spending on “at-home food”—food and beverages purchased from retail stores. Shifts between store formats could have implications for shopping patterns. A recent ERS study computed “healthy basket” scores for monthly at-home food and beverage purchases. The higher the score, the closer a household’s purchases aligned with healthy-diet expenditure shares. Baskets were categorized by the format accounting for the household’s largest share of food expenditures. Scores were highest for households predominantly shopping at warehouse club stores (8.3), supermarkets (8.2), and supercenters (8.0). Household food baskets dominated by purchases from drug stores, convenience stores, and dollar stores had the least healthful purchases. Over 2008-12, an average of 67 percent of households in the data predominantly shopped at supermarkets, 17 percent at supercenters, and 6 percent at warehouse club stores. The other 10 percent shopped predominately at drug, dollar, convenience, and other store formats.

 

4.      Western irrigation has become more efficient over time

Efficient irrigation systems can help maintain farm profitability in an era of increasingly limited and more costly water supplies. More efficient gravity irrigation uses the force of gravity and field borders or furrows to distribute water across a field. It may also use laser-leveling to improve flood irrigation. More efficient pressure-sprinkler irrigation delivers water under lower pressure sprinklers and systems using drip/trickle tubes and micro-spray nozzles. The efficiency of irrigation systems is particularly important in the Western States—such as Nebraska, California, and Texas—where water demand for agriculture is greatest and diminishing water supplies are expected to affect future water availability. Data from USDA’s Farm and Ranch Irrigation Survey (FRIS) show that irrigated agriculture in the West has become more efficient over time. More efficient irrigation systems (both gravity and pressure-sprinkler) were used on about 36 percent of total irrigated acres in the West in 1994, but increased to nearly half by 2013. More efficient pressure-sprinkler irrigation alone accounted for about 15 percent in 1994, but more than 37 percent in 2013. The share of acres using more efficient gravity systems peaked in the late 1990s, but then declined as farmers increasingly turned to the even more efficient pressure-sprinkler systems.

 

5.      Rural school districts less likely to serve local food frequently in school meals

According to USDA’s 2013 Farm to School Census, 35 percent of all U.S. school districts reported serving local food in school meals during the 2011-12 school year. Twenty-two percent of all school districts served at least one locally-sourced food item daily or more than weekly, and 19 percent of school districts—containing 30 percent of U.S. school children—served local food daily. ERS researchers analyzed data from the Farm to School Census to identify which types of school districts were more likely versus less likely to serve local foods frequently in school meals. Rural school districts were 11.2 percentage points less likely to serve local food daily than school districts in cities, after accounting for other school district characteristics, such as region, enrollment level, per capita income of the surrounding county’s residents, and county-level density of farmers’ markets. School districts in suburbs and towns were also significantly less likely to serve local food daily compared to districts in cities.

 

6.      Poorest U.S. households spent 33 percent of their incomes on food in 2015

While households spend more money on food as their incomes rise, food expenditures represent a smaller portion of income as households allocate additional funds to other goods. In 2015, U.S. households in the highest income quintile spent an average of $12,350 on food—both from grocery stores and eating out. This spending accounted for 8.7 percent of their incomes. Middle income households spent an average of $5,799 on food, or 12.4 percent of their incomes. Households in the lowest income quintile spent less for food on average—$3,767 in 2015—but their food expenditures accounted for 33 percent of their incomes. Two years earlier, the lowest income quintile spent 36.2 percent of their incomes on food. The share of income spent on food depends on several factors, including food prices and incomes. While retail food price inflation was relatively low in 2013, income levels were also lower than in 2015, contributing to the higher percent of income spent on food in 2013 by the lowest income households. Food expenditures as a share of income could fall in 2016 and 2017 across income levels due to declining retail food prices in 2016 and a continued trend downwards in prices for some foods in 2017.

 

7.      Personal income grows, state ranks largely unchanged

According to the most recent U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis state personal income data, national per capita income grew 4.0 percent from 2015 to 2016, and growth since 2012 is at 12.0 percent. States are experiencing this growth disparately, however, with five-year growth rates ranging from -0.6 percent (North Dakota) to 17.6 percent (California). Over this period, few states experienced significant changes in their performance relative to their peers — just four states moved more than five rankings — but shifts between income quintiles and variable growth rates suggest that more movement will be witnessed over the next few years.

 

8.      Majority of Native Americans Live in Rural Areas and Small Towns, Not in Urban Areas as Commonly Reported, According to New “Twice Invisible” Report

First Nations Development Institute (First Nations) today published a report that clears up a longstanding “urban legend” that has had a negative impact on Native communities. The report – Twice Invisible: Understanding Rural Native America – challenges the commonly held belief that the majority of American Indians and Alaska Natives live in cities and urban areas. The Twice Invisible report looks closely at Census data and uses a definition of “rural” areas developed by the Housing Assistance Council that is calculated with a formula that takes into account population and housing density. Using this definition, First Nations’ researchers found that 54% of American Indian and Alaska Native people, or a majority, live in rural and small-town areas on or near reservations, contrary to common myths. The report was authored by Dewees and Benjamin Marks, First Nations’ Senior Research Officer, and was made possible by support from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation’s Catalyzing Community Giving initiative. The full report can be downloaded from the Knowledge Center on the First Nations website here

 

9.      SNAP participation more closely linked to poverty than unemployment rate

USDA’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) is the Nation’s largest food assistance program. In an average month in fiscal 2016, 44.2 million people—about 14 percent of the Nation’s population—participated in the program. Unlike other food and nutrition assistance programs that target specific groups, SNAP is available to most needy households with limited income and assets, subject to certain work and immigration status requirements. As a means-tested program, the number of people eligible for SNAP is inherently linked to the health of the economy. The share of the population receiving SNAP benefits generally tracks the poverty rate and, to lesser degrees, the unemployment rate and the poverty rate for children under age 18. Improvement in economic conditions during the early stage of recovery may take longer to be felt by lower educated, lower wage workers who are more likely to receive SNAP benefits, resulting in a lagged response of SNAP participation to a reduction in the unemployment rate.

 

EVENTS/LEARNING

1.      First Nations Ag Business Webinars

First Nations Development Institute (First Nations) is offering a FREE three-part First Nations Knowledge webinar series that will help you manage and grow your agricultural business. These are perfect for existing Native farmers, ranchers and food producers, and will be especially helpful for entrepreneurs looking to launch an agriculture-related business. You do not need to attend all of the webinars in the series even though they build off of each other over the three-week period. However, we believe it would greatly benefit participants to tune into the complete series in chronological order. If that's not possible, the webinar recordings and materials will be posted soon after each one is completed under the "Previous Webinars" tab on the www.firstnations.org/fnk webpage. The first webinar in the series has been completed, but please register for each of the remaining webinars individually at the links below.

 

Ø  Webinar 1: (Completed) Understanding the Local Food System & Defining Your Ag-Business Opportunity | Held on Wednesday, May 17, 2017

This webinar provided an overview of the current status of the U.S. food system and explained how this impacts your tribal agricultural business opportunity. It reviewed case-study examples of tribally-controlled agricultural and local food enterprises. It also helped guide entrepreneurs through a process of exploring their personal motivation behind the ag-business concept and helped entrepreneurs’ define their personal and business goals. All of these facets will be combined to help the entrepreneur clearly develop a draft ag-business concept.

 

Ø  Webinar 2: Understanding Your Market & Developing a Marketing Plan | Wednesday, May 24, 2017 2 p.m. Mountain Time (1 p.m. Pacific / 3 p.m. Central / 4 p.m. Eastern)

This webinar will build on Webinar 1 to help ag entrepreneurs understand the opportunities, as well as potential limitations, of their location and local foods market. We will also explore key concepts related to sales and marketing, including understanding local needs, defining your products and services, and selecting your distribution channels. All of these topics will be combined to help the entrepreneur develop a clear and focused marketing plan.

 

Ø  Webinar 3: Defining Your Key Business Operations & Developing a Financial Plan | Wednesday, May 31, 2017 2 p.m. Mountain Time (1 p.m. Pacific / 3 p.m. Central / 4 p.m. Eastern)

This webinar will build on the lessons learned in Webinars 1 & 2 to help ag entrepreneurs explore their risks and develop a plan for operational and staffing needs. We will also explore key financial principles and concepts such as investment requirements, pricing strategies, and operating expenses that are all directly related to profitability. We will also look toward the future to explore potential exit strategies. All of these topics will be combined to help the ag entrepreneur develop a clear and focused plan for operational and financial management.

 

2.      Kresge Water-Systems Initiative to Invest in Sustainable Solutions

Kresge is bringing together staff from the Environment Program, Investments team, and Social Investment Practice to consider how they can use the full range of capital tools to advance a water-equity agenda that reflects the needs and priorities of low-income communities and supports solutions to address the climate-related impacts on water systems.

 

3.      Stanford Researchers Create "Living Map" of Water Financing Ideas

A team of researchers at Stanford has created a "Living Map" of innovative ways to finance water projects in the United States that they hope will help regions finance water infrastructure upgrades.

 

Our next GoodGreens meeting is on Thursday, May 25th, from 10:00 to 12:00 PM Central Time in FNS’ offices on the 20th floor at 77 West Jackson Boulevard, Chicago, or via call-in (to listen) and Live Meeting (to see presentations). Please see below for a final meeting agenda, instructions on how to attend, information about June's meeting (which will focus on soil health), grants & funding, resources, news, events, and other opportunities. 

If you’re attending in person, please be aware that we are in a federal building and you’ll need to pass through security. After passing through security, head to the third bank of elevators on the left and proceed to the 20th floor. Once you arrive on the 20th floor, look for GoodGreens signs.

If you have any questions, please email Alan Shannon or call 312-353-1044. We look forward to hearing from our speakers and talking with many of you! 

 

4.      More Events/Opportunities

 

May 25th Meeting Agenda and Attendance Options

10:00 - 12:00 PM Central Time

Welcome and Introductions

 

Alison Alkon, Associate Professor of Sociology and Food Studies, University of The Pacific, will share information about research related to farmers markets, CSAs, and food systems that serve and are owned by their communities. Alison will also share information about the necessity of economic policies—and not simply a dependence on market mechanisms—that determine a community’s food sovereignty.

 

Nick Groch, Clinical Nutrition Manager, Presence Saints Mary and Elizabeth Medical Center (Chicago), will share information about the hospital’s nutrition and agriculture initiatives, which include a twice monthly farmers market, to improve access to healthy produce for the organization’s low-income community patients.

 

Brenda Scott Henry, Director of Green Urbanism, and Mary Mulligan, Brownfields/Urban Conservation Specialist, City of Gary (IN), will share information about their work to support community efforts related to urban agriculture. Some of these efforts include the Stewart House Urban Farms & Gardens, farm and food projects in the Emerson neighborhood and area churches, and the Vacant to Vibrant initiative, which aims to install rain gardens as a way to manage stormwater in vacant, abandoned lots. Much of Gary is classified by USDA as a food desert.

 

Shermain Hardesty, Cooperative Extension Specialist and Lecturer, University of California Davis Agricultural and Resource Economics, will share information about her team’s recent study on the local economic benefits of direct marketing (e.g.: farmers markets, roadside farm stands, community-supported agriculture programs). Sacramento-area farmers and ranchers who engage in direct marketing generated twice as much regional economic impact per dollar of output, compared to area food producers who did not market directly.

 

Rachel Armstrong, Founder & Executive Director, Farm Commons (MN), will share information about her organization’s work to empower direct-to-consumer farmers with the proactive legal attention they need to build resilient farm businesses. Recently, Farm Commons received a USDA Farmers Market Promotion Program Grant. As part of the grant project, the organization will host “Direct-to-Consumer Farm Law” workshops, distribute legal Quick Guides, and help educate over 7,000 farmers about how the law affects agritourism, CSA operations, farmers market sales, food safety, and other direct-to-consumer topics.

 

Sharing by member organizations of recent news/developments (All).

 

Attending Remotely 

For those participating remotely, call-in and Live Meeting/Webinar information is below. 

Call-in information is the same for both.

Call-in Information:

  • Number: 1-888-844-9904 
  • Access Code: 7734875            

Live Meeting/Webinar Information:

  • First Time Users: To save time before the meeting, check your system to make sure it is ready to use Microsoft Office Live Meeting
  • Download and install the Microsoft Live Meeting Client here
  • Click Join the meeting
  • Launch.rtc should download. Click it. Live Meeting Client should start.
  • If prompted for Meeting ID and Entry Code, they are: 
    Meeting ID: GGMay No Entry Code

If you still cannot enter the meeting, contact support

Notice: Microsoft Office Live Meeting can be used to record meetings. By participating in this meeting, you agree that your communications may be monitored or recorded at any time during the meeting.

 

 

News, Resources, Grants and More... 

(click on the links below to see more)

Upcoming Meeting Agendas

Resources, Tools, & Technical Assistance

Data, Statistics, & Reports

Food Waste

News

Employment Opportunities

 

For more community economic development related content please subscribe to the following:

Interagency Working Group on Cooperative Development

Cooperative Reports, Publications, and Statistics

Rural Cooperative Magazine

Placed Based Initiatives & Regional Programs

Community Economic Development

 

Newsletters and email from which we gather this information include:

Foundation Center RFP Service

v Health Listserv

v Center for Rural Entrepreneurship

Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City

Blue Avocado Nonprofit Magazine

Rural LISC e-newsletter

National Association for Development Organizations (NADO)

ERS

Orton Family Foundation

 

Thanks,

Dave

 

Associate Professor and Community Development Specialist

Department of Agricultural Economics

Oklahoma State University

323 Agricultural Hall

Stillwater, OK 74078-6025

405-744-6170

405-744-8210 – fax

http://rd.okstate.edu

Find grants and professional development resources on my blog
http://okextdevres.blogspot.com/

 

Thursday, May 18, 2017

Community Resources

Federal, State, and Nonprofit Opportunities

Veterinary Services Grant Program

The purpose of the Veterinary Services Grant Program (VSGP) is to develop, implement and sustain veterinary services and relieve veterinarian shortage situations in the United States and U.S. Insular Areas. More information...

Application Deadline: May 19, 2017

 

Rural Cooperative Development Grant Program

This program helps improve the economic condition of rural areas by helping non-profit corporations or higher education institutions in the startup, expansion or operational improvement of rural cooperatives and other mutually-owned businesses through cooperative development. More information...

Application Deadline: May 26, 2017

 

Food Safety Outreach Program

The Food Safety Outreach Program will focus on delivery of customized training to members of the target audiences. New projects will focus on, but are not limited to, addressing knowledge and resource gaps for the target audience in the areas of pre- and post-harvest water testing and sampling, soil amendments, developing supply chain programs, and/or developing food safety plans. The program will continue to fund projects that develop bilingual and culturally appropriate training resources. More information...

Application Deadline: June 6, 2017

 

Economic Development Assistance Programs

The Economic Development Administration's (EDA's) mission is to lead the Federal economic development agenda by promoting innovation and competitiveness, preparing American regions for economic growth and success in the worldwide economy. More information... 

Application Deadline: Rolling

 

Rural & Tribal Passenger Transportation Technical Assistance

The rural program provides technical assistance for small communities of less than 50,000 people. The focus of the program is economic development: helping small and emerging businesses and stimulating economic development through new and improved public transportation.

The tribal program is designed to help Native American tribes enhance economic growth and development by improving transportation services. Technical assistance is limited to planning and may support transit service improvements and expansion, system start-up, facility development, development of marketing plans and materials, transportation coordination, training and other public transit problem solving activities, click here. 

Location: Nationwide

Application Deadline: Rolling

 

Homegrown By Heroes

The Homegrown By Heroes label is a key differentiation for farmer veteran products in competitive markets. The HBH label gives farmer veterans the point-of-sale visibility they need to be successful in the marketplace. The HBH label also affords consumers a tangible way to support veterans while providing an avenue to share the veteran's story. More information...

Dates: Annually renewable

Location: Nationwide

 

Helpful Tools and Internship Opportunities

Hoeven Delivers Congressional Response to 2017 State of Indian Nations Address

February 13, 2017 -- U.S. Senator John Hoeven (R-ND), Chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, delivered the Congressional Response to the 2017 State of Indian Nations address given by the National Congress of American Indians President Brian Cladoosby. In his remarks, Chairman Hoeven highlighted his legislative priorities for the committee, including jobs and economic development, health care, energy, housing, public safety, and veterans. He also emphasized the need to continue working in a bipartisan manner to advance safety, security and opportunity in Indian Country. Read more... 

 

 

Training Opportunities

Funders Forums

We all want to know the secrets to receiving funding from foundations and corporations. The Center's Funders Forum can help! This will consist of a morning session, networking lunch, and after-lunch session where the dynamic panel of corporate and foundation employees will offer you tips and share their expertise.

Oklahoma City - May 16, 2017
Tulsa - May 30, 2017 

 

Preparing for a Financial Audit

Having an annual financial audit is a best practice as defined by the Standards for Excellence Institute, and requires significant work from the entire organization. This three-hour workshop will help participants understand the administrative responsibilities of a financial audit, from the perspective of an audit team.

Tulsa - May 18, 2017 

Oklahoma CityJune 8, 2017

 

2017 Brownfields and Sustainable Community Building Workshop

This workshop will focus on the resources available to assist with planning your redevelopment, and where to focus resources to ensure success when applying for grants. Registration check-in will begin at 8:30 a.m. and the workshop will run from about 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Lunch will be served.

Stillwater - May 23, 2017

 

Other Opportunities

Congressional Art Competition for Oklahoma High School Students

 Students submit artwork to their elected representative's office, and panelists select winners from each district. Winning works are exhibited at the U.S. Capitol, and winners have the opportunity to be recognized at an awards ceremony in Washington, D.C. More information...
The instructions for your entries are available through your representative's link below.
1st District - Congressman Jim Bridenstine
2nd DistrictCongressman Markwayne Mullin
3rd District - Congressman Frank Lucas
4th District - Congressman Tom Cole
5th District - Congressman Steve Russell

 

Oklahoma State University Medical Summer Camp "Operation Orange"

Spend a day in the life of a medical student at Operation Orange, a summer camp for high school students interested in a career in medicine.

Dates and locations vary through the month of June.

Click here to access the flyer.

 

Fifth and Eighth-Grade Teachers Encouraged to Applyfor Colonial Williamsburg Teacher Institute Fellowships

While at Colonial Williamsburg -- the world's largest living history museum -- Oklahoma teachers meet character interpreters of 18th-century people and are immersed in early American history through hands-on activities and reenactments of historic events. . More information...

Application Deadline for 5th Grade Teachers: June 8-14, 2017

Application Deadline for 8th Grade Teachers: June 15-21, 2017

 

American Indian Alaska Native Tourism Association Scholarship

Established to provide American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian students with financial assistance to earn a degree or certificate in the hospitality, tourism, recreation, culinary arts or related fields.  AIANTA will award three (3) individuals who have met all scholarship application criteria. AIANTA would like to encourage Indigenous students to build their careers in the tourism industry while sustaining and strengthening their cultural legacy. Access the application here! 

Application Deadline for Fall 2017 Semester: July 28, 2017

Application Deadline for Spring 2018 Semester: December 1, 2017

 

A Comprehensive Downtown Revitalization Program for Rural Kentucky

May 31, 2017 @ 10:00am CT/11:00am ET

We will speak briefly about a new program designed to invigorate approximately 12 downtowns in rural Kentucky. We will highlight the following programs that focus on regionalism, small business development, community design, and youth engagement.

http://srdc.msstate.edu/trainings/crdwebinars.html

 

Sonny Perdue Sworn in as 31st U.S. Secretary of Agriculture

On Tuesday, April 25, Sonny Perdue was sworn in as the 31st U.S. Secretary of Agriculture by fellow Georgian and Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court Clarence Thomas in a brief ceremony at the Supreme Court building. The U.S. Senate confirmed Secretary Perdue by a vote of 87-to-11 on Monday evening. Perdue's wife, Mary Ruff Perdue, held the Bible as he took the oath of office. He later addressed employees at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) before getting to work on his first day. USDA also launched his official Twitter handle: @SecretarySonny

https://www.usda.gov/media/press-releases/2017/04/25/sonny-perdue-sworn-31st-us-secretary-agriculture?utm_content=&utm_medium=email&utm_name=&utm_source=govdelivery&utm_term=

 

New Funding and Financing Community and Economic Development Publication Now Available

One of the most critical challenges facing community leaders and community development professionals is how to pay for new projects.  A new comprehensive guide is now available from the University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service: “Show Me The Money – a Guide to Funding and Financing Community and Economic Development in Your Community or Region. This guide presents 12 major funding strategies and over 50 real-world examples that have been successfully employed by communities and regions to finance community and economic development efforts. The guide describes a 12-step process for funding community development projects and a Fundability Checklist and Meter to help assess the likelihood that your approach is going to be successful. It will be useful for private, public, and non-profit organizations.

https://www.uaex.edu/publications/

 

Great Plains IDEA Announces Master's Program and Graduate Certificate in Community Development

Community Development is a progressive field, actively promoting positive social, economic, cultural and environmental change. It encourages people to see the "whole picture," engaging citizens in democratic decision making and action. In the Great Plains IDEA Community Development program, a diverse faculty from North Dakota State, South Dakota State, University of Nebraska, Iowa State, and Kansas State teach a variety of courses leading to a master's degree or graduate certificate in community development. These courses equip our students with a breadth of perspective and depth of cutting-edge skills and knowledge in the field, engages them in a network of dedicated practitioners and academics, and provides a master's degree or graduate certificate to work most effectively in, or to advance beyond, their current position. The Great Plains IDEA online programs are ideal for community development students and practitioners. Students seeking a professional career in community development can attain the necessary knowledge base without commuting or relocating.

http://www.hsidea.org/programs/cdev/

 

South Dakota State University Announces Graduate Certificate in Native Community and Economic Development

Programs in extension, education and social service agencies have recognized the unique challenges in native communities and, therefore, have developed specific approaches for their programs to be successful in Indian Country, which has created a growing need for a workforce cognizant of these unique challenges. The certificate in Native Community and Economic Development is designed for professionals interested in expanding their skills and understanding of these approaches, as well as those with an interest in working with Native communities. Today, students taking these courses are often employed or seeking employment in Native-serving organizations and agencies who have extended their programming to Native-majority communities and neighborhoods. https://www.sdstate.edu/sites/default/files/SDSU-Fact%20Sheet-Native%20Communities%20and%20Economic%20Development_2016_0.pdf

 

Grant Connections

Southern SARE Releases 2018 Research & Education Grants Call for Proposals

Deadline: June 2, 2017

Southern SARE’s new education grant, falling under the Research & Education Grant Program, is a broader education and outreach effort. The grant is open to anyone in agriculture interested in conducting education and outreach activities for the benefit of the greater sustainable ag community. Research pre-proposals focus on sustainable agriculture based on a systems approach to research, which aims to understand how the components of a system interact with each other and function as a whole. The central purpose of research proposals is research-based projects with an educational/outreach component involved. Education pre-proposals allow applicants to focus on educational activities, in which their cooperating partners and intended audiences would be involved. Education proposals provide a synopsis of the proposed educational approach to mitigate or solve a problem and encourage farmer adoption of recommended practices or strategies. http://www.southernsare.org/Grants/Apply-for-a-Grant

 

Job Announcements

Director: NCI, Michigan State University School of Planning, Design, and Construction

Start Date: September 1, 2017

Michigan State University’s School of Planning, Design, and Construction (SPDC) and MSU Extension seek a Director for their NCI unit. The position is 100% funded by MSU Extension through its Greening Michigan Institute. Formerly known as the National Charrette Institute, and based in a landscape architecture/urban planning tradition, NCI is currently focused on non-credit training and developing collaboration by design process techniques to address pressing social problems, with focus on urban and regional issues.  NCI brings nationally recognized training curricula and hands-on community-based procedures along with its established networks.

http://careers.msu.edu/cw/en-us/search/?job-mail-subscribe-privacy=agree&search-keyword=NCI

 

Conferences, Workshops, Trainings

NERCRD Rural Business Innovation and Economic Development Workshop: Charleston, WV

May 15-17, 2017

The Northeast Regional Center for Rural Development (NERCRD) is pleased to announce a new conference in its acclaimed What Works workshop series. The conference theme this year is Rural Business Innovation and Economic Development, and the event will be held in conjunction with Create West Virginia’s Universal Design conference, at the Civic Center in Charleston, WV on May 15-17, 2017. 1 The conference seeks to answer the question, How do we (re)create buildings, communities, learning places, programs and products to better meet needs of 21st Century people? https://webaccess.psu.edu/?cosign-aese.psu.edu&https://aese.psu.edu/nercrd/events/what-works

 

NACDEP and CDS Joint Conference: Big Sky, MT

June 11-14, 2017

The National Association of Community Development Extension Professionals and the Community Development Society are hosting a joint conference under the theme, “Big Skies/Bold Partnerships Moving Mountains Together”.

http://www.nacdep.net/2017-cds-nacdep-conference

 

Cambio de Colores (Change of Colors): St. Louis, MO

June 14-16, 2017

Call for Proposals, Deadline February 6, 2017. This multidisciplinary conference has traditionally focused on native and foreign-born Latino newcomers, but is interested in the challenges inherent in multicultural changing communities, including the experiences of all newcomers, faith groups, and marginalized groups. The integration of these very diverse groups is being studied by academics and pursued by stakeholders, as the newcomers seek to become part and parcel of the social, economic, and cultural fabric of their new communities. The conference theme this year is “Todos Juntos: Collaboration and Unity in Uncertain Times.” Todos Juntos means “all together”, and seeks to build collaboration across sectors and unite communities across differences in the common goal of supporting everyone’s wellbeing in our changing, multicultural communities.

http://www.cambiodecolores.org/

 

National Extension Tourism Conference: Princeton, NJ

August 8-10, 2017

Experience tourism in the 21st Century in New Jersey, engaging with current research, program models and business development in tourism. This conference is an outstanding opportunity for Extension professionals and others working in the broad area of tourism and recreation – including tourism service providers and businesses – to share programs, initiatives, research, and success stories, and to network with other professionals.

http://extensiontourism.net/conference/

 

Professional Agricultural Workers Conference: Tuskegee, AL

December 3-5, 2017

Theme: "Cultivating a Culture of Success through Innovation in Agriculture, Forestry & Natural Resources" We invite the submissions of papers, posters, panel discussions and workshop proposals for the 74th PAWC on the conference themes. http://www.pawc.info/

 

Webinars

Rapid Response Team Webinar: Civil Discourse on Race Relations

May 17, 2017 @ 1:00pm CT/2:00pm ET

The Rapid Response Team on Civil Discourse, established by ECOP, is hosting a one-hour webinar to showcase findings and share potential next steps for this work. Please save the date and join in the conversation. http://ecopmondayminute.blogspot.com/

 

Understanding the Fundraising Cycle

This one-hour webinar will explore the circular, ongoing nature of fundraising. Elements of the fundraising cycle explore in this webinar include: donor identification, qualification, planning, cultivation, solicitation, negotiation, closure, acknowledgement, and stewardship.

Click here for more information and registration.

When: May 31, 2017      1:30pm - 2:30pm 

 

Bringing Life Downtown After Hours: Arts, Shopping, Culture After 5

Being open evening hours is not just a matter of extending store hours. It is more like opening a whole different store with different customers. Becky McCray and Deb Brown be sharing ideas and examples from real small towns. Deb will share from her experience as a Chamber of Commerce director, and Becky will share from her perspective as a business owner in a small town. More information...

When: Webinar continually available.

 

Thanks,

Dave

 

Associate Professor and Community Development Specialist

Department of Agricultural Economics

Oklahoma State University

323 Agricultural Hall

Stillwater, OK 74078-6025

405-744-6170

405-744-8210 – fax

http://rd.okstate.edu

Find grants and professional development resources on my blog
http://okextdevres.blogspot.com/

 

Friday, May 12, 2017

Community Resources

Federal, State, and Nonprofit Opportunities:

Crop Protection and Pest Management Program

The purpose of the Crop Protection and Pest Management program is to address high priority issues related to pests and their management using IPM approaches at the state, regional and national levels. The CPPM program supports projects that will ensure food security and respond effectively to other major societal pest management challenges with comprehensive IPM approaches that are economically viable, ecologically prudent, and safe for human health. More information...

Application Deadline: May 9, 2017

 

Veterinary Services Grant Program

The purpose of the Veterinary Services Grant Program (VSGP) is to develop, implement and sustain veterinary services and relieve veterinarian shortage situations in the United States and U.S. Insular Areas. More information...

Application Deadline: May 19, 2017

 

Rural Cooperative Development Grant Program

This program helps improve the economic condition of rural areas by helping non-profit corporations or higher education institutions in the startup, expansion or operational improvement of rural cooperatives and other mutually-owned businesses through cooperative development. More information...

Application Deadline: May 26, 2017

 

Food Safety Outreach Program

The Food Safety Outreach Program will focus on delivery of customized training to members of the target audiences. New projects will focus on, but are not limited to, addressing knowledge and resource gaps for the target audience in the areas of pre- and post-harvest water testing and sampling, soil amendments, developing supply chain programs, and/or developing food safety plans. The program will continue to fund projects that develop bilingual and culturally appropriate training resources. More information...

Application Deadline: June 6, 2017

 

Economic Development Assistance Programs 

The Economic Development Administration's (EDA's) mission is to lead the Federal economic development agenda by promoting innovation and competitiveness, preparing American regions for economic growth and success in the worldwide economy. More information... 

Application Deadline: Rolling

 

Rural & Tribal Passenger Transportation Technical Assistance 

The rural program provides technical assistance for small communities of less than 50,000 people. The focus of the program is economic development: helping small and emerging businesses and stimulating economic development through new and improved public transportation.
The tribal program is designed to help Native American tribes enhance economic growth and development by improving transportation services. Technical assistance is limited to planning and may support transit service improvements and expansion, system start-up, facility development, development of marketing plans and materials, transportation coordination, training and other public transit problem solving activities.
For more information and to register, click here. 

Location: Nationwide
Application Deadline: Rolling
Source: Community Transportation Association of America

 

Homegrown By Heroes

The Homegrown By Heroes label is a key differentiation for farmer veteran products in competitive markets. The HBH label gives farmer veterans the point-of-sale visibility they need to be successful in the marketplace. The HBH label also affords consumers a tangible way to support veterans while providing an avenue to share the veteran's story. More information...

Dates: Annually renewable

Location: Nationwide

 

Choctaw Nation Opportunities

 

Oklahoma Hunting and Fishing License

The Choctaw Nation is excited to announce that hunting and fishing license will now be available for all Choctaw citizens residing within Oklahoma regardless of age or if they are a current Oklahoma lifetime license holder.

For more information or to access the online application you can click here.  

 

Helpful tools and internship opportunities

 

Hoeven Delivers Congressional Response to 2017 State of Indian Nations Address 

February 13, 2017 -- U.S. Senator John Hoeven (R-ND), Chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, delivered the Congressional Response to the 2017 State of Indian Nations address given by the National Congress of American Indians President Brian Cladoosby. In his remarks, Chairman Hoeven highlighted his legislative priorities for the committee, including jobs and economic development, health care, energy, housing, public safety, and veterans. He also emphasized the need to continue working in a bipartisan manner to advance safety, security and opportunity in Indian Country. Read more... 

 

The Oklahoma Brownfields Program and TAB, the Technical Assistance to Brownfields Program, with Kansas State University are presenting a Free workshop “Brownfields & Sustainable Community Building” at OSU’s Botanical Gardens in Stillwater, OK on May 23rd, and at OU’s National Weather Center in Norman, OK on May 25th. This will be an opportunity for communities to hear local leaders discuss sustainable redevelopment, and where to focus redevelopment projects to turn abandoned idle properties, including brownfields, into vibrant spaces such as housing, parks, trails and job-creating businesses.

Attendance is free but registration is required as lunch will be provided. We are very excited about this event and looking forward to seeing everyone!

For questions, please contact:

Alisha Grayson (ODEQ), alisha.grayson@deq.ok.gov, 405-702-5113

Oral Saulters (KSU TAB) osaulter@ksu.edu, 785-280-0931

Stillwater Workshop http://www.ksutab.org/education/workshops/details?id=245

Norman Workshop http://www.ksutab.org/education/workshops/details?id=246

 

Training opportunities

 

Fundraising Summits

The Fundraising Summit provides nonprofit professionals an opportunity to gain extensive knowledge about fundraising in a short, 6-hour setting. Fundraising experts present in quick succession their knowledge about best practices on the many topics every nonprofit professional needs to know. Participants will learn insider-tips for applying for grants, tried-and-true tactics for making bold asks, and flawless management for annual fundraising plans.

Ponca City - May 11, 2017

 

Funders Forums 

We all want to know the secrets to receiving funding from foundations and corporations. The Center's Funders Forum can help! This will consist of a morning session, networking lunch, and after-lunch session where the dynamic panel of corporate and foundation employees will offer you tips and share their expertise.
Oklahoma City - May 16, 2017
Tulsa - May 30, 2017 

 

Preparing for a Financial Audit 

Having an annual financial audit is a best practice as defined by the Standards for Excellence Institute, and requires significant work from the entire organization. This three-hour workshop will help participants understand the administrative responsibilities of a financial audit, from the perspective of an audit team. 

Tulsa - May 18, 2017 

Oklahoma CityJune 8, 2017  

 

2017 Brownfields and Sustainable Community Building Workshop

This workshop will focus on the resources available to assist with planning your redevelopment, and where to focus resources to ensure success when applying for grants. Registration check-in will begin at 8:30 a.m. and the workshop will run from about 9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Lunch will be served.

StillwaterMay 23, 2017

 

Other Opportunities

 

Congressional Art Competition for Oklahoma High School Students 

Students submit artwork to their elected representative's office, and panelists select winners from each district. Winning works are exhibited at the U.S. Capitol, and winners have the opportunity to be recognized at an awards ceremony in Washington, D.C. More information...
The instructions for your entries are available through your representative's link below.
1st District - Congressman Jim Bridenstine
2nd District - Congressman Markwayne Mullin
3rd District - Congressman Frank Lucas
4th District - Congressman Tom Cole
5th District - Congressman Steve Russell

 

Oklahoma State University Medical Summer Camp "Operation Orange"

Spend a day in the life of a medical student at Operation Orange, a summer camp for high school students interested in a career in medicine.

Dates and locations vary through the month of June.

Click here to access the flyer.

 

Fifth and Eighth-Grade Teachers Encouraged to Apply for Colonial Williamsburg Teacher Institute Fellowships

While at Colonial Williamsburg -- the world's largest living history museum -- Oklahoma teachers meet character interpreters of 18th-century people and are immersed in early American history through hands-on activities and reenactments of historic events. More information...
Application Deadline for 5th Grade Teachers: June 8-14, 2017
Application Deadline for 8th Grade Teachers: June 15-21, 2017

 

American Indian Alaska Native Tourism Association Scholarship

Established to provide American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian students with financial assistance to earn a degree or certificate in the hospitality, tourism, recreation, culinary arts or related fields.  AIANTA will award three (3) individuals who have met all scholarship application criteria. AIANTA would like to encourage Indigenous students to build their careers in the tourism industry while sustaining and strengthening their cultural legacy. Access the application here! 

Application Deadline for Fall 2017 Semester: July 28, 2017
Application Deadline for Spring 2018 Semester: December 1, 2017 

 

Webinars

 

Idea Friendly Towns – a webinar from SaveYour.Town (Becky McCray and Deb Brown)

Research has shown that being open to new ideas is tied to our economic future. How can we open up our towns to new ideas?

We'll share the Idea Friendly method: Gather Your Crowd, Build Connections and Take Small Steps.

We'll share real-world examples of ways people have successfully applied the Idea Friendly concepts to shape a better future for their town.  

The old way of deciding the future was done by organizations and government, our new way is done by everyone.  The old way had someone in control, our new way is to get as many people as possible trying new things.  It sounds informal doesn't it?  Because it is.  The days of a group of men sitting in a backroom deciding what happens in your town are over. Join us to learn how to use the Idea Friendly Platform to create the kind of town you want to live, work and play in! 

When: May 17, 2017 @ 12 pm Central (it will be recorded)

Where: Sign up at http://saveyour.town/ideafriendlywebinar/?mc_cid=48dd5cbe00&mc_eid=83e416986e

Cost: $20 for this webinar only, $25 for 2 week access to all of the webinars on SaveYour.Town

(Once you’re registered, you can schedule more than one viewing during the two week window so you reach as many people as possible.

We allow you to watch the live event, invite friends and hold replays in your town, as long as you’re personally present each time. If others want to watch without you, we ask that they also register. )

 

Understanding the Fundraising Cycle
This one-hour webinar will explore the circular, ongoing nature of fundraising. Elements of the fundraising cycle explore in this webinar include: donor identification, qualification, planning, cultivation, solicitation, negotiation, closure, acknowledgement, and stewardship.
Click here for more information and registration.
When: May 31, 2017      1:30pm - 2:30pm 

 

Bringing Life Downtown After Hours: Arts, Shopping, Culture After 5

Being open evening hours is not just a matter of extending store hours. It is more like opening a whole different store with different customers. Becky McCray and Deb Brown be sharing ideas and examples from real small towns. Deb will share from her experience as a Chamber of Commerce director, and Becky will share from her perspective as a business owner in a small town. More information...

When: Webinar continually available. 

 

 

USDA and Food Nutrition Service April 27th Meeting Summary

 

1. Grace Gershuny, Author, Organic Revolutionary: A Memoir of the Movement for Real Food, Planetary Healing & Human Liberation), shared information about her experiences helping to write the first-ever USDA National Organic program regulations from the mid-1990s to publication of the final rule in 2000. The organic movement was rooted in historical grassroots efforts that brought together disparate organic-oriented organizations (e.g.: environmentalists, food relief, the farm industry, and consumers) to overcome barriers to ultimately codify organic standards. Some of the challenges to finalizing the rules included: disagreements about the use of synthetics, reconciling negative public comments, and facilitating agreement between stakeholders. Contact Grace here

 

2. Victor Strausbaugh, Allofeed, shared information about an app that he built that connects farmer vendors and CSA subscribers or those who can’t physically participate at farmers markets via a home delivery system via on-demand driver couriers. Using an easy-to-use interface, customers can place orders with vendors who use the app. Currently, the app supports more than 60 vendors around the Columbus, OH, area. Additionally, the app features a recipe database for vendor products. Contact Victor here.

 

3. Cheryl Graffagnino, Healthy Food Access Program Manager, City of Columbus and Matt Brown, Planning Administrator, Franklin County Economic Development & Planning Department shared information about the creation of the City of Columbus and Franklin County Local Food Action Plan. The plan helped to implement the city’s and county’s goal to improve all residents’ access to nutritious and affordable food, prevent food waste, enhance coordination among existing food resources, and address barriers to access, including poverty, underemployment, and unemployment. Launched in November, 2013, the planners included Columbus Councilmember Priscilla Tyson, County Commissioner John O’Grady, 24 community members, and the nonprofit Local Matters. During the first phase, the team gathered information by reviewing more than 24 food planning documents and published data and convening 18 community meetings in seven Columbus neighborhoods. Altogether, 900 stakeholders participated. Second, the team identified 800 potential actions, which were revised and consolidated into 27 actions in the final Local Food Action Plan. Last, the team wrote the plan, including for each action: the current status, partners involved, desired outcomes, starting steps, measures, and related resources. To collect feedback, the Columbus Health Department led 11 public feedback sessions. Throughout the process, the team heard from the community that health equity, cultural competency, and continued development of the emergency food system were important issues. The plan also established a city-county joint local food team to oversee and ensure coordination between efforts. Contact Cheryl here.

 

4. Adam Montri, Co-owner and Managing Member, Ten Hens Farm, shared information about the Southeast Michigan Seasonal High Tunnel Education Initiative. As background, high tunnels (also called hoop houses) are unheated greenhouse structures that trap solar heat to allow farmers to grow crops outside of the growing season. The initiative is led by four partner organizations: USDA NRCS (which funds the project via the EQIP program), the SE Michigan Sustainable Resource Alliance (the grant recipients), and Keep Growing Detroit, and Ten Hens Farm, which coordinate project implementation and outreach to farmers. The initiative started as a partner project in Cleveland between Congresswoman Marcia Fudge’s office, Ten Hens Farm (which provided technical assistance), NRCS, and Fair Food Network (which had received an USDA EQIP grant). Since then, the initiative has expanded to Detroit/Wayne County, seven counties in Southeast Michigan, and Flint/Genesee County. As part of the initiative, the team provides educational workshops, hands-on builds, one-on-one technical assistance, and multi-farm tours. The workshops cover various topics, including: high tunnel basics, irrigation and fertility, pest management, winter crops, and marketing. Contact Adam here.

 

5. Nick Nichols, Author, shared information about his book, “I’m Hungry, I’m Hungry, I’m Hungry, Too”. Nick was made aware of the importance of hunger when a close relative qualified for free lunch. Researching the subject, Nick realized that 49% of the children in his La Crosse area qualify for free lunch, that 14,000 people in La Crosse County were food insecure in 2015, and that there are nine food pantries in La Crosse district schools. The book addresses various topics related to food insecurity, including lack of food access, cooking skills, obesity, and bullying. Nick partnered with the Hunger Task Force of La Crosse to publish over 3,300 copies of the book. Additionally, Nick partnered with the Rotary club to read and discuss the book at local schools. As an outcome of the event, over 2,800 books were distributed to eleven schools, public library, and local women’s shelter. Additionally, schools will continue to hold the event in 2018 and one school organized a food backpack event for students. A statewide school nutrition group will distribute the book at their conference in July, 2017.  Contact Nick here.

 

6. Sharing by member organizations of recent news/developments (All).

Vicky Reeves, Grant Program Manager, Organic Valley, shared information about the Farmers Advocating For Organic (FAFO) Grant Program, which is now accepting applications. The program funds projects in the areas of research, education, and advocacy to protect and promote the organic industry and the livelihood of organic farmers. For more information, please view the overview packet.

 

USDA and Food Nutrition Service May 25th Meeting Agenda

 

1. Alison Alkon, Associate Professor of Sociology and Food Studies, University of The Pacific, will share information about research related to farmers markets, CSAs, and food systems that serve and are owned by their communities. Alison will also share information about the necessity of economic policies—and not simply a dependence on market mechanisms—that determine a community’s food sovereignty.

 

2. Nick Groch, Clinical Nutrition Manager, Presence Saints Mary and Elizabeth Medical Center (Chicago), will share information about the hospital’s nutrition and agriculture initiatives, which include a twice monthly farmers market, to improve access to healthy produce for the organization’s low-income community patients.

 

3. Brenda Scott Henry, Director of Green Urbanism, and Mary Mulligan, Brownfields/Urban Conservation Specialist, City of Gary (IN), will share information about their work to support community efforts related to urban agriculture. Some of these efforts include the Stewart House Urban Farms & Gardens, farm and food projects in the Emerson neighborhood and area churches, and the Vacant to Vibrant initiative, which aims to install rain gardens as a way to manage storm water in vacant, abandoned lots. Much of Gary is classified by USDA as a food desert.

 

4. Shermain Hardesty, Cooperative Extension Specialist and Lecturer, University of California Davis Agricultural and Resource Economics, will share information about her team’s recent study on the local economic benefits of direct marketing (e.g.: farmers markets, roadside farm stands, community-supported agriculture programs). Sacramento-area farmers and ranchers who engage in direct marketing generated twice as much regional economic impact per dollar of output, compared to area food producers who did not market directly.

 

5. Rachel Armstrong, Founder & Executive Director, Farm Commons (MN), will share information about her organization’s work to empower direct-to-consumer farmers with the proactive legal attention they need to build resilient farm businesses. Recently, Farm Commons received a USDA Farmers Market Promotion Program Grant. As part of the grant project, the organization will host “Direct-to-Consumer Farm Law” workshops, distribute legal Quick Guides, and help educate over 7,000 farmers about how the law affects agritourism, CSA operations, farmers market sales, food safety, and other direct-to-consumer topics.

 

Grants, Resources, Opportunities, and More... 

(click on the links below to see more)

June 22nd Meeting Agenda

Events/Opportunities

Resources, Tools, & Technical Assistance

Grants & Funding

Data, Statistics, & Reports

Food Waste

News

Employment Opportunities

 

Thanks,

Dave

 

Associate Professor and Community Development Specialist

Department of Agricultural Economics

Oklahoma State University

323 Agricultural Hall

Stillwater, OK 74078-6025

405-744-6170

405-744-8210 – fax

http://rd.okstate.edu

Find grants and professional development resources on my blog
http://okextdevres.blogspot.com/